Robustly Testing Version Control at Mozilla

October 14, 2014 at 12:00 PM | categories: Mercurial, Mozilla | View Comments

Version control services and interaction with them play an important role at any company. Despite version control being a critical part of your infrastructure, my experience from working at a few companies and talking with others is that version control often doesn't get the testing love that other services do. Hooks get written, spot-tested by the author, and deployed. Tools that interact with version control often rely on behavior that may or may not change over time, especially when the version of your version control software is upgraded.

We've seen this pattern at Mozilla. Mercurial hooks and extensions were written and deployed to the server without test coverage. As a result, things break when we try to upgrade the server. This happens a few times and you naturally develop an attitude of fear, uncertainty, and doubt around touching anything on the server (or the clients for that matter). If it isn't broken, why fix it prevails for months or years. Then one an enthusiastic individual comes around wanting to deploy some hot new functionality. You tell them the path is arduous because the server is running antiquated versions of software and nothing is tested. The individual realizes the amazing change isn't worth the effort and justifiably throws up their hands and gives up. This is almost a textbook definition of how not having test coverage can result in technical debt. This is the position Mozilla is trying to recover from.

One of the biggest impacts I've had since joining the Developer Services Team at Mozilla a little over a month ago has been changing the story about how we test version control at Mozilla.

I'm proud to say that Mozilla now has a robust enough testing infrastructure in place around our Mercurial server that we're feeling pretty good about silencing the doubters when it comes to changing server behavior. Here's how we did it.

The genesis of this project was likely me getting involved with the hg-git and Mercurial projects. For hg-git, I learned a bit about Mercurial internals and how extensions work. When I looked at Mercurial extensions and hooks used by Mozilla, I started to realize what parts were good and what parts were bad. I realized what parts would likely break after upgrades. When I started contributing patches to Mercurial itself, I took notice of how Mercurial is tested. When I discovered T Tests, I thought, wow, that's pretty cool: we should use them to test Mozilla's Mercurial customizations!

After some frustrations with Mercurial extensions breaking after Mercurial upgrades, I wanted to do something about it to prevent this from happening again. I'm a huge fan of unified repositories. So earlier this year, I reached out to the various parties who maintain all the different components and convinced nearly everyone that establishing a single repository for all the version control code was a good idea. The version-control-tools repository was born. Things were slow at first. It was initially pretty much my playground for hosting Mercurial extensions that I authored. Fast forward a few months, and the version-control-tools repository now contains full history imports of our Mercurial hooks that are deployed on hg.mozilla.org, the templates used to render HTML on hg.mozilla.org, and pretty much every Mercurial extension authored by Mozillians, including pushlog. Having all the code in one repository has been very useful. It has simplified server deployments: we now pull 1 repository instead of 3. If there is a dependency between different components, we can do the update atomically. These are all benefits of using a single repository instead of N>1.

While version-control-tools was still pretty much my personal playground, I introduced a short script for running tests. It was pretty basic: just find test files and invoke them with Mercurial's test harness. It served my needs pretty well. Over time, as more and more functionality was rolled into version-control-tools, we expanded the scope of the test harness.

We can now run Python unit tests (in addition to Mercurial .t tests). Test all of the things!

We set up continuous integration with Jenkins so tests run after check-in and alert us when things fail.

We added code coverage so we can see what is and isn't being tested. Using code coverage data, we've identified a server upgrade bug before it happens. We're also using the data to ensure that code is tested as thoroughly as it needs to be. The code coverage data has been invaluable at assessing the quality of our tests. I'm still shocked that Firefox developers tolerate not having JavaScript code coverage when developing Firefox features. (I'm not saying code coverage is perfect, merely that it is a valuable tool in your arsenal.)

We added support for running tests against multiple versions of Mercurial. We even test the bleeding edge of Mercurial so we know when an upstream Mercurial change breaks our code. So, no more surprises on Mercurial release day. I can tell you today that we have a handful of extensions that are broken in Mercurial 3.2, due for release around November 1. (Hopefully we'll fix them before release.)

We have Vagrant configurations so you can start a virtual machine that runs the tests the same way Jenkins does.

The latest addition to the test harness is the ability to spin up Docker containers as part of tests. Right now, this is limited to running Bugzilla during tests. But I imagine the scope will only increase over time.

Before I go on, I want to quickly explain how amazing Mercurial's .t tests are. These are a flavor of tests used by Mercurial and the dominant form of new tests added to the version-control-tools repository. These tests are glorified shell scripts annotated with expected command output and other metadata. It might be easier to explain by showing. Take bzpost's tests as an example. The bzpost extension automatically posts commit URLs to Bugzilla during push. Read more if you are interested. What I like so much about .t tests is that they are actually testing the user experience. The test actually runs hg push and verifies the output is exactly what is intended. Furthermore, since we're running a Dockerized Bugzilla server during the test, we're able to verify that the bzpost extension actually resulted in Bugzilla comments being added to the appropriate bug(s). Contrast this with unit tests that only test a subset of functionality. Or, contrast with writing a lot of boilerplate and often hard-to-read code that invokes processes and uses regular expressions, etc to compare output. I find .t tests are more concise and they do a better job of testing user experience. More than once I've written a .t test and thought this user experience doesn't feel right, I should change the behavior to be more user friendly. This happened because I was writing actual end-user commands as part of writing tests and seeing the exact output the user would see. It is much harder to attain this sense of understanding when writing unit tests. I can name a few projects with poor command line interfaces that could benefit from this approach... I'm not saying .t tests are perfect or that they should replace other testing methodologies such as unit tests. I just think they are very useful for accurately testing higher-level functionality and for assessing user experience. I really wish we had these tests for mach commands...

Anyway, with a proper testing harness in place for our version control code, we've been pretty good about ensuring new code is properly tested. When people submit new hooks or patches to existing hooks, we can push back and refuse to grant review unless tests are included. When someone requests a new deployment to the server, we can look at what changed, cross-reference to test coverage, and assess the riskiness of the deployment. We're getting to the point where we just trust our tests and server deployments are minor events. Concerns over accidental regressions due to server changes are waning. We can tell people if you really care about this not breaking, you need a test and if you add a test, we'll support it for you. People are often more than happy to write tests to ensure them peace of mind, especially when that test's presence shifts maintenance responsibility away from them. We're happy because we don't have many surprises (and fire drills) at deployment time. It's a win-win!

So, what's next? Good question! We still have a number of large gaps in our test coverage. Our code to synchronize repositories from the master server to read-only slaves is likely the most critical omission. We also don't yet have a good way of reproducing our server environment. Ideally, we'd run the continuous integration in an environment that's very similar to production. Same package versions and everything. This would also allow us to simulate the actual hg.mozilla.org server topology during tests. Currently, our tests are more unit-style than integration-style. We rely on the consistent behavior of Mercurial and other tools as sufficient proxies for test accuracy and we back those up with running the tests on the staging server before production deployment. But these aren't a substitute for an accurate reproduction of the production servers, especially when it comes to things like the replication tests. We'll get there some day. I also have plans to improve Mercurial's test harness to better facilitate some of our advanced use cases. I would absolutely love to make Mercurial's .t test harness more consumable outside the context of Mercurial. (cram is one such attempt at this.) We also need to incorporate the Git server code into this repository. Currently, I'm pretty sure everything Git at Mozilla is untested. Challenge accepted!

In summary, our story for testing version control at Mozilla has gone from a cobbled together mess to something cohesive and comprehensive. This has given us confidence to move fast without breaking things. I think the weeks of people time invested into improving the state of testing was well spent and will pay enormous dividends going forward. Looking back, the mountain of technical debt now looks like a mole hill. I feel good knowing that I played a part in making this change.

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